Justin Stoddart
Hey, welcome back to the Think Bigger Real Estate Show. I’m your host Justin Stoddart fired up to be back with you after a big business planning workshop yesterday. And we’re following up with some amazing value today that is going to help you maximize the amount of money that you’re putting out in sponsorships, and as real estate agents, you’re oftentimes getting hit up like, hey, put your money here, put your money here and how do you maximize that? How do you get the best use of that money? I have with me an expert, a dear friend and an expert on this topic. He’s been doing it for for a long, long time, we’re going to get into that. But before I do, I want to remind you the mission of this show, which is very similar to mine, which is to help you think bigger. I know that as you begin to think bigger, your possibilities start to expand, you start to take different actions, you start to see things that have always been there, you just didn’t see them before. And I know that one of the best ways to help you think bigger is to put you around other big thinkers, people that are doing great things that will inspire you to again expand your possibilities. So with that being said I’m a estatic today to have with me one of my longest term friends somebody who was actually a college roommate, since that time, he’s done some very impressive things–built an amazing family. In addition to that, he has a really impressive background all about sponsorships and he’s been on the… Jason let me welcome to the show first and foremost you come on to Think Bigger Real Estate Show.

Jason Smith
Hey, I’ve got crazy stories about you being roomates and we’ll keep it will keep it clean here.

Justin Stoddart
Sounds like a little bit blackmail folks. Listen. Yeah, we’ll keep it we’ll keep it will keep it clean. Keep in mind we went to BYU, right? So the stories aren’t that crazy, but they probably at least caused me to blush. But Jason, tell us a little bit about your background, what you what you’re doing now and kind of what led to that so we can kind of get a get a picture of kind of where you’re speaking from when it comes to helping real estate agents be really good at maximizing their money when it comes to sponsorships.

Jason Smith
Yeah, so as you mentioned, went to Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah and had the pleasure of being your roommate,

Justin Stoddart
Is that on your resume, you put that?

Jason Smith
Right at the top. No, went to BYU and got my, my degree in advertising communications there and after that, well during my time at at BYU, I was I was interning with the Utah Jazz and helping with some game operation promotional type of experience there and and work and from there, build some relationships and and had a little quick stint in Denver where I was working for the Denver newspaper agency for a little bit. But always my love was if I could combine sports and advertising You know, it was that’s what I wanted to do right and, and so kept in touch with the jazz and there’s a full time position that came up and after a year of being in Denver came back and sold. corporate sponsorship sponsorships for For mountain America, or excuse me for the Utah Jazz, and then after, after a few years of that there I went down to back to BYU in the athletic department. They had a third party rights holder that was managing their sponsorships for them for the athletic department. And it called IMG college and worked for them for about seven years or so and then went from the sponsorship sell side and selling sponsorships and helping brands activate their sponsorships and these different venues and, and I came on the brand side and the corporate side with mountain America, as I mentioned before, and and so I’ve been doing that for about six years now where we’re, I now go to the BYU us or the Utah Jazz or the Real Salt Lake so the Boise State’s and and work with them on maximizing the value And the exposure for mountain America credit union, which is a regional credit union based in Utah.

Justin Stoddart
Awesome stuff. So again, you’ve worked with some of the biggest brands in the Intermountain West, I should say some of the biggest teams, those that have loyal followings, right? Yeah, I know. IMG for those that aren’t familiar with with that group. They run advertising and promotions. They are an outsourced kind of arm to help sell promotions and advertising for hundreds of universities, including the University of Oregon, and countless others, right? They really just have a great system. And your job there, Jason, as I as you stated, but just to kind of reiterate how this is going to tie into today’s conversation, is that you would go out and meet knee to knee businesses and say, How much money do you have to advertise? Let’s maximize that. Right let’s get the most amount of exposure, the most amount of reach, the most amount of results for this amount of money that you said you have advertise. Is that true?

Jason Smith
Yes, absolutely.

Justin Stoddart
No. So now you find yourself on the other side of the table. You’re part of a regional credit union that is looking to maximize its money whether you’re putting it at Boise State, whether you’re putting it, you tie it BYU at the Utah Jazz, these other places where there are sports marketing happening, you’re trying to say, okay, where can we get the best bang for our buck with all of these different audiences? Right?

Jason Smith
Yeah, yeah. And it’s it’s tricky because there’s a lot of there’s a lot of noise that can happen in a lot of these venues. You’ve been to, you know, Portland Trail Blazers, games, or Oregon games or Oregon State games, you know, there and in Portland, that there’s a there’s a lot of noise that can take place there. So you got to be really strategic on how you separate yourself.

Justin Stoddart
Yeah. And I think, you know, for the real estate agents that are watching this again, I know I’ve got an audience that extends beyond residential real estate agents. Let me bring us back here. So for them, it’s probably more like their local high school right? They’re high school is coming to them. And they’re saying, Hey, you know, we’re selling advertising at games, you can put up a banner in the outfield, you can put a banner up in the gym, you can put a banner out along the fence at the football games, you can put advertising inside of the, you know, inside of the roster, right? There’s all these different places where you can put money. A lot of us see posters around town and have a picture of like the baseball team, and there’s different sponsors around the edges, right? Lots of demands on people’s money again, going back to the business planning workshop that I taught yesterday, according to the millionaire real estate agent, book, which is a great textbook on how to build a really successful business. Again, not just be a successful salesperson, but to actually build a sales business. They talk about having 10% of your marketing or 10% of your of your gross commission. Go back towards marketing and you might think like, that’s a lot of money like fun. Let’s say it’s $300,000 gross commission. It’s $30,000 a year and again, me being a guy that’s That’s very referral based. I think a lot of people spend a lot of money in areas where they maybe shouldn’t, where they could take that money and actually pour it back in to the biggest advocates of their business actually getting a chance to go have meals with them, maybe intimate client client events, I think, if you’re looking at, okay, if I’m going to really dedicate 10% of my gross commission this year, I’m going to first and foremost, I’m gonna put on the list of like, I’m going to take care of the people that are taking care of my business, but then you get to a point where it’s like, okay, I can’t like it doesn’t make any sense to put more money into those people not gonna get any more results and they don’t need it right. We’re good. So now it really becomes more of a marketing game right? You’ve essentially taken care of your Salesforce right which your your key advocates, but now it’s how do you expand that and and I shared this with you earlier, Jason and a lot of my audience has heard me say this is it in order for people to consider you to help them buy or sell real estate, you have to own a piece of real estate in the rain. You also know mindshare. You have to you have to show up. There’s this zero percent chance that they will use you if they have forgotten you like it’s virtually impossible, they will never use you. If you’re actually not in their brain and they can’t remember you, right? They will not I share a story. When Chris and I, my wife, we were selling our first home in Utah, actually, I was very good friends with the agent who I probably should have used. But I simply forgot about him, signed up with another agent didn’t do the greatest of jobs. And but it was only because he was in my brain that I used him. I wouldn’t prefer to use my friend, Craig, who ended up you know, it wasn’t great for the relationship, the fact that I didn’t use him and I should have shame on me for forgetting that forgetting him shame on him for not owning a piece of real estate in my brain, right? I forgot at the time of needing a real estate agent. I forgot him and I think that’s what most real estate agents are trying to avoid is the fact that they’ve got friends and family peers, past clients that have that that would naturally use you if you if they didn’t forget about you, right. And this ongoing quest of how do I actually expand my reach get more brand awareness so that when I get an opportunity, people like oh, I’ve seen you, I’ve heard you, you’re familiar, you must have been doing this your experience I could because your name is not unfamiliar to me. So with that amount of money right after you, I think you’ve, you’ve really poured money into taking care of your sphere. Now it comes to this, this reach of marketing, right, which is, you can put money out that that money’s not working for you. The first step is we have people that are taking care of looking out for you. Now, with Jason’s expertise, we’re going to go into what are the best practices to actually get that money, those dollars working for you and bringing back clients for you. So Jason, I’m gonna turn it over to you here a little bit, you again worked on the side of helping you helped real estate teams, individual real estate agents, as well as insurance teams. That came to you to said we have this amount of money that we want to spend, how can we best use it share with us both the good and the bad of what you’ve seen of what people have have done that was maybe not a good use of money or that was a good use of

Jason Smith
You know and those are those are all amazing. points. And I think the key is, is when you talk about real estate of mind, you, you have to make sure that what is the message in that mind to what kind of real estate is it? You know, is it a real is it really good real estate or is a bad real estate? You know, so so you have to you have to make sure that that your messages right, you could be super annoying in your advertising. Right? And that could be for better or for worse, right? I mean, they might always remember you because of something that you’ve done that that maybe wasn’t wasn’t, you know, could have a negative impact on their mind. But but you want to you want to look at it from a positive standpoint. So I am I’m big on, on making sure that you’re that you’re giving back to the community and helping the people in which you serve. And so when, with real estate agents specifically, I feel like there is a big focus on the face of a real estate agent and we Everyone’s smiling right now, as I as I, as I said, it’s like, I gotta have my face on there. Right? So people know who I am. I some sometimes that’s, that’s that that can leave a negative impact. And I’ll show, you know, a case in point. So I had a, a real estate company and I’ll leave them I’ll leave them nameless, you know, I’m here with a regional real estate agency that will actually this was an insurance agency, actually, that that was, you know, along the same lines, they wanted to make sure the faces were out there. Well, at football games, this this agency wanted to sponsor a kind of a repetitive type of promotion where every time the football team converted on third down and got a first down each agent and there were probably 40 agents in this in this in this district. That was that was In sponsoring this team, they, they wanted to put their face and have it rotate through every time there was a first down, but third down, and so their faces were going up, you know, like, like, like crazy. And it was hard to hard to manage that, you know, from internally with that. But it became to have a negative impact where we were actually starting to receive calls on the negativity of that impact. And now Now I’m going to now I’m going to take I’m going to take a different approach to that, you know, I recommend to them that they do something different, but that’s what they wanted to do. They were all equally paying for the sponsorship. So they wanted to make sure that their faces were seen on this big video board. But take a little bit of a twist on that. So with mountain America, we have a similar type of promotion where at the Utah Jazz we, every time the Utah Jazz make a three pointer. They’ll be brand new That goes up, but it’s all branding. And it’s it’s mountain America branding. But what we do is we we take a little bit more of a different approach than then, hey, this is who you call and this is who you are. This is the email address, or this is the phone number, or it’s, it’s more for every three pointer that the Utah Jazz make during the season, we donate $50 to the Huntsman Cancer Institute. Wow. And so what what happens that that adds up at the end of the jazz season. Now I get with real estate agents, this probably wouldn’t be totally doable, and I’ll take it down to scale to like high schools. But But you know, at the end of the season, you know, we’re looking at a $50,000 check, you know, with how many three pointers the NBA is jacking up right now, but, but that’s what

Justin Stoddart
I want to make an association right here is that you’re associating your brand Yes. With you know, people are already celebrating, right? It’s like a three pointer. Yeah, right. Like the three and everyone’s like, Yeah, yes. And then it’s like this you start to associate these these feelings of like excitement with Mountain America Credit Union. Brilliant, right?

Jason Smith
It’s in, it’s in it becomes instead of having my, our logo flashed up all the time it is flashed up, it’s there. But there were now top of mind. And its associated with something positive now, not only within the game, but also that we’re giving back to the community that we serve. And so it becomes it becomes this. And we did a survey through throughout the entire state of Utah on what was the number one thing that that associated us and it was the three pointers and giving back to the community. And it’s tied through our radio through our TV through our end game experienced social media, you name it, it’s all tied through it. So anytime a jazz fan is consuming that that information, and there’s a three pointer, it’s going to be associated there and it can be associated to giving back so let’s associate that to like a high school right? So instead of throwing a banner up at a baseball with your face and the phone number and things like that. What about what about just your logo? And maybe who you are, like as far as your name. But then, but but try and find a way and I’m not going to tell you what to do. But like, try and find a way that’s giving back to the community? How are you recognizing five high school students from that high school, on being kind of other kids at school that are excelling in and getting good grades? And how are you recognizing people in the community that are doing good. And as people start to associate that when they come to a football game, and they see you on the field recognizing five kids for how amazing they’ve done in their grades or treating people with kindness or whatever it may be? Like, that’s going to have a positive real estate in the mind, right of what goes on there. And so, I share with you kind of a big scale with the jazz but you can do the same thing on a lower scale and really show you’re serving because people want to do business with those that they trust and they feel that you’re giving back to the community, in your advertising and sponsorship efforts like that is going to go a long way.

Justin Stoddart
I would imagine that if, as these promotional opportunities go out to a real estate agent, or they hear about them, that the other side would be totally cool with somebody being creative to say, hey, look, I’d love to sponsor here’s what I’d like to do. I’d like to give back to the community. I’d love to highlight stuff that’s good. I’d have I can’t other than just the logistical challenge of managing that I can’t see of any downside of why an organization why a school why a team would not want to have somebody sponsor and give back or highlight stuff you know, maybe it’s not even more monetary compensation maybe like you said, it’s just, you know, we’re going to highlight people that are doing good, like, rewarding good behavior, you know. I want to point back to your your point about the this insurance cover company that had 40 agents that were bringing a new agent up every time there was a first down. We are already so inundated in our society with information streams. So you think about it used to be just a phone call, right? The only thing that would really, and maybe like letters in the mail were the things that that took our attention and maybe TV. Now you add in the fact that we’ve got text messaging, and now we’ve got Facebook, we’ve got Facebook Messenger, we’ve got Instagram, Instagram messenger, we’ve got LinkedIn, we’ve got LinkedIn messenger

Unknown Speaker
It’s a lot of noise.

Justin Stoddart
We’ve got Twitter feeds, we’ve got like, it’s just, it’s insane how many inputs of information we have coming at us. And I think what ends up happening is that brands get diluted really quickly. And the only ones that stand out are the ones that A) spend enormous amounts of effort and, or money, or they get really creative, right? And I think that’s what I would encourage this audience to go is it. You don’t have the budget to spend over 10% of your gross commission on marketing you shouldn’t. It’s going to It’s not, it doesn’t pencil, and even getting to that number might cause you to feel uncomfortable, right? $30,000 if your GCI 300,000. $30,000 is a lot of money. Now, the thing that I would encourage you to do is be creative, like some of these things that you’re sharing here, Jason, let’s talk about somebody approaches you to say, should I hang… Or would you be willing to sponsor a banner in the outfield at a baseball game? I’ve got thoughts on that. I’d love to hear your thoughts. Like, should you shouldn’t you? What are your thoughts?

Jason Smith
It really depends on what your strategy is. Right? So it’s so I mean, you really have to you have to look at that. That’s the whole point is you have to have a marketing strategy. You can’t just start shotgun and things everywhere. You can’t. You can’t just go just because a kid rocked up and said, Hey, will you give me $300 for this for this alpha wall banner that you do it? I mean, it may be strategic, that might be a big client of yours, right? That that kid, you know, he might be he might be the ticket to a $2 million home, right you know, so You’re like, actually, that’s $300 very well spent in that case, right? You know that to help so, but but you have to be strategic about it go Where, where, where are my, where are my potential clients? Where are my potential customers? Where, where are they? And, and if you don’t know that you really have to sit down and look at it. And there’s, there’s people who can help you with that too. Right? But, but I think you have to really have a marketing strategy before you start throwing money in places or else it won’t do you any good at that point.

Justin Stoddart
It’s a quick way to go, you know, to go broke and get really frustrated really quickly and and give yourself you know, pink slip. You know, I tell people like, and it’s exactly to your point, Jason, I was smiling when you said that because I totally agree, it’s like, Where are my people at where’s the highest likelihood that what like, where I’m going to get business? And if it’s from the baseball team, because I have a son on the baseball team, and I’m gonna be sitting in the stands at baseball games all year long and all the parents who are the most like You could refer me are staring at my face in the outfield, then that’s a really good use of money. But if, for example, your kid doesn’t play sports, and you’re never going to go to a baseball game, and you’re just some random face out in the audience, the chances of that creating any sort of return is, is is slim to none. Right? So I think, I love that question that you asked, like, who are our people? Where’s our business going to come from? And, like, what’s the message that we put out? Like, what’s the message that they care about? Which I hear you saying is you’ve kind of been the architect behind this Mountain America three point. deal, right is like who are our people? What do they care about? They care about the Jazz winning and making three pointers. They care about, you know, the Huntsman Cancer Institute and all the good that they’re doing. Everyone’s lives been touched by cancer. And so it’s this like, like, you’ve really nailed it there. Right?

Jason Smith
But let me add to that too, is we’re not just doing that at the Jazz. Like it at BYU games, when when when BYU is getting first downs, we’re doing the same thing but we’re donating to the American Red Cross, right or up at Boise State in Idaho. You know, we’re when we get first downs or 3-pointers, we’re donating $50 to the Bronco Life Foundation or the St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital. Right. So it’s what matters to some of these different areas. And that’s always not, it’s not always one thing, you know, in one region of the area, right? We look at what is important in some of these other these other areas. But the case in point you have to there’s this consistency now, right? So when people associate themselves with Mountain America, it’s giving back to the community. We’re people helping other people, we’re helping members achieve their financial dreams. We want to to be that that real estate in the mind when they’re thinking, who can I trust to help us with an auto loan or if we want a home equity line of credit or if we want to do our mortgage, or if we want to look at investment portfolios, or if we just want to get our kids youth accounts, or checking accounts or savings accounts, right? We want them to go, we can trust Mountain America. They, they they give back and I want to I want to associate and work with, with those that that care about the community that I live in.

Justin Stoddart
And again, back to not being diluted. And I think it gets really important. In fact, we did a panel, I was part of a TEDx growth summit here in Portland. And I had one of my favorite people in agents, Heather Robbins, who does a really good job and her comment was, you first need to find out like, identify like Who are you? How do you want to show up? Like, why are you doing this business? What impact do you want to have not just, I want to, I want to create some income for me and my family. Like that’s not enough. You got to get more clear on how do you want to impact your community? And once you have that, then you can start to say, Okay, how do I want impact my community? Well, I’m really passionate about animals right rescue animals, I’m really passionate about the environment. I’m really passionate about children and or, you know, solutions for cancer, like whatever it is. That’s already like in your heart that’s already like, yeah, that’s important to me. That’s really important to me. Once you identify what that is, now, you can start to build what I hear you saying, Jason is a is okay. If that’s who I am. Who else is my like, who else is my tribe? Who else cares about that?

Jason Smith
And it doesn’t always it always doesn’t mean that you have to give money either to somebody right for or like donation to a to a charity or or a cause. That’s right. I mean, it you know, it can be human capital, it could be you, you and your your agency going and serving in the community somewhere. You know, there’s so many different ways that you can do it because I can I can just hear people go Jason, we don’t have that kind of money. Just throw $50 for that. Well, you don’t have to do that. Like, the point is, is to be creative in your community that you serve. Decide how how you can how you can make an impact. And by doing that, and associating your name and your agency name, with with the community, and that that does include having your logo on things that does include advertising and some of those things. But it also means that you have to be a little bit creative and how you’re showing that you care, as well.

Justin Stoddart
Yeah. Yeah. Great stuff. Man. I quick action steps for anybody that’s listening today. Let’s kind of walk through this. First of all, again, kind of what we’ve identified, what is What do you care about? Right? Like, what really is it your heart that you really want to have your brand associated with? Once you’ve identified that? that’s step number one. Step number two is Who else cares about that? Who’s my audience, right? Step three is where do these people hang out? Where Where is my tribe at? And then next step after that would be how do I craft a message that communicates what we care about, and how I’m contributing and a part of that, would you say that’s a that’s a fair, tactical list for everybody?

Unknown Speaker
Yeah. And I think you just you have to really know, know your audience, you got to know your demographic, right? You got to know exactly who you’re targeting. And you got to know who you want to be, as well, too, right? Like, what is your brand? What would it What is your brand? What do you want that to be? And then from there, outline a marketing plan. That is creative. That’s not just reactive, but actually strategic. And then craft that plan that, that and this is key that separates you from the competition, right, you have to be separated. So that’s we’ve talked about a lot of creative stuff that you can’t just go by on the radio waves or the TV, right? We’ve talked about really creative things. And so that’s, that’s actually the really fun part of marketing is sitting in a room with your team and going, Hey, how do we be a little bit more strategic in our marketing efforts? And how can we, instead of just doing the traditional advertising which is super noisy, right now how can we how can we Carve that out. And I think that probably would be a great step is to if you have a team or even if it’s just you and bouncing it off friends or another professional in the, in the marketing industry, you know, sitting down and saying, hey, how can we how can we? How can we think a little bit bigger? Right? Yeah. Yeah.

Justin Stoddart
A great question here from Stephanie Peck, great, great friend of mine, great agent here in the Portland area. She asked this question, what’s a good script to respectfully decline? When I’m asked to sponsor but choose not to. That’s a good question Stephanie.

Jason Smith
Yeah, in a lot of times with that, when when we need to, when we need to respectfully decline things, I usually it’s going to be something along the lines of Hey, we actually have a market a marketing strategy, and we have certain dollars allocated to this strategy, though this is an amazing opportunity. You know, I’m we’re, we’re not able to do that right now. I’m not saying, I’m not saying no, forever. But for right now in our strategy, we’re going we’re going this direction. But thank you. Thanks for thanks for thank you for give, be grateful that they’re giving you that opportunity. And but but just let them know that you’re that you’re your strategy and your marketing strategy is, is in a different direction. And it doesn’t mean that what you’re bringing is not worth anything, but it’s not the direction that you’re going right now.

Justin Stoddart
Stephanie, let us know if you have a follow up question to that. I think that was great, Jason. And I think part of what I hear you teaching us, Jason as well as that if you’re really intentional, then these opportunities, like you’re going to be able to rather than saying, like girls come to you and say Hey, would you be on our poster for our volleyball team, and you blend in you’re one of 14 different companies around the edge, or you’re one of 13 companies on the back of a T shirt that nobody is ever going to recognize not gonna move the needle. Ask yourself Again, like what’s How do I want to be seen in the community? Like, what are the causes I care about? What are the causes my customers care about? Those should be very similar. And then how can I creatively go and create some marketing campaigns again, for those that work in the Portland market that that are real estate agents, I would love to work with you on that. Jason, I both kind of geek out on marketing stuff, and that we could probably come up with something creative to help you produce some solutions here, and maybe even tap into Jason and say, Hey, man, what do you think of this? I’m sure. We’d love to help you help. So again, please utilize us for that. But again, I think if you can be proactive, and have an advertising budget in place actually know how much you’re going to spend, then it gets easier to say, you know, our marketing dollars already committed for this year. Appreciate asking, and I think, you know, the way you stated it, Jason was was awesome. Thanks for that question, Stephanie. All right, Jason, anything else that we may have missed before we wrap up?

Unknown Speaker
No, I think we’re good. Yeah. It’s been a pleasure being on and and I was just telling Justin earlier before we hopped on I need to get back to Oregon. I grew up in Tigard. So

Justin Stoddart
Tigard High. Yep. We it’s funny, Jason. I actually met we were college roommates at BYU. Prior to that, we were a college football teammates. We first met at, at fall camp. He was an offensive lineman, I was running back and so we had a good relationship there and friendship that’s that’s blossomed over multiple decades now. He’s one of my favorite people. I get more excited when Jason Smith comes across my phone than just about anybody else. So we have a good time. There’s all kinds of inside jokes that maybe will tell you at some future time.

Jason Smith
We’ll do a whole interview just off of that one day,

Justin Stoddart
Oh, that would be fun, just like a throwback, making fun of ourselves. So Jason, the final question, the signature question of the show that I ask everybody that comes on, which is you’re a big thinker, I mean, you’ve done some amazing things you’re entrusted with, I don’t know how many millions of dollars of advertising money from your regional credit union to maximize that a lot. Obviously, you’ve you’ve, you know, built an amazing career and brand and reputation for yourself as well as helped other companies do that… you’re a big thinker. Is my point. I’d love to have you teach us what you do to continually expand your own possibilities to continue to be a big thinker and continue to think big. I know, you also have some other business interests anyway, you’re just got some big things going. Teach us what you do to continue to think bigger?

Unknown Speaker
Well, I think the first thing is you can never be complacent ever, and there never be a time that we ever just arrive. Right? You always have to be thinking, you know, with my team here about America, you know, I’m, I’m looking at my 2020 year and going and we’re going to have a team get together and and the whole the whole thing is going to be based around, what’s next, how do we become a little bit better. Even with the current part internships that we have, how can we how can we make those even better? Or how we how can we provide even more value? And I think the more that you have those types of dialogue, and I think the key is, is we get super busy in our lives, that whether it’s in work and in our personal lives that but with work specifically. And we can do the same thing with with our families as well. But, but making time for strategic thinking making time to really think outside the box because that is when you get people in a room and you start throwing ideas up on the wall. That is that creative juice that flows is so important, because it’s so easy to be reactionary. Just be like, Okay, I have all the tasks that need to be done, I need to get those done, which are important and we need to get those done. But we need to schedule out time to really think and think bigger, and that’s the that’s the key is really just Just setting aside time to actually do the thinking. And, and, and also, I just, I was laying in bed last night I couldn’t sleep. And I started having some big ideas come to my head. And I reached for my phone and I just, you know, my wife sleep everyone sleep in the house and I just start typing them down and writing down the ideas and the big ideas that come into your mind. Write them down immediately. Because if I want to written those down, and I woke up the next morning, I probably would have forgotten, forgotten. So. So it’s it’s taking it’s again, taking time when big ideas calm even throughout while you’re driving. Obviously don’t write while you’re driving, but just make sure make sure that you capture those moments that you have ideas come to your mind. Otherwise, they’re really fleeting and they could they could just go and you can lose it.

Justin Stoddart
Yeah, I mean one one tactic for while you’re driving, just grab the voice notes, right? Yeah. Just do a quick recording. So awesome stuff Jason. No doubt, you can see why having a practice like that has encouraged you to continue to be a big thinker. I want to thank everybody for tuning in. And thank you, Jason, for your time, its been super fun and I knew it would be, and I’m thrilled to have this information out there helping agents as they plan their 2020 and decide where are my marketing dollars going to go, how much am I going to commit to this? Now you now have a framework and some really good principles through which you can be able to maximize your dollar. So thank you Jason, for the awesome conversation and for all that you have contributed to the Think Bigger Real Estate audience. And I want to…

Jason Smith
Yeah, my pleasure, man.

Justin Stoddart
And I want to end with this request of everybody, which is three simple words and they are GO THINK BIGGER. Thank you, Jason. Appreciate you being a part of the show and we’ll talk soon, everybody!

The Upstream Model
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